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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 65-70

Measles-induced hearing loss: Pattern, diagnosis, and prevention among children in Ekiti State, Southwest Nigeria


1 Department of Ear, Nose and Throat, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ido - Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria
2 Department of Pediatrics, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ido - Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria
3 Department of Family Medicine, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ido - Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria
4 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ido - Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria
5 Department of Ear, Nose and Throat, Afe Babalola University, Ado -Ekiti and Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido - Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Adebola Ayotomiwa Olajuyin
Department of Ear, Nose and Throat Surgery, Ekiti-State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti-State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/sjoh.sjoh_10_21

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Background: Measles-induced hearing loss is an otologic tragedy. In this study, we looked into the hypothesis that measles-induced hearing loss may exhibit specific pattern the knowledge of which may guide clinicians on its diagnosis and prevention among children. Objective: The objective of the study was to describe the pattern, diagnosis, and prevention of measles-induced hearing loss among children. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of children with measles-induced hearing loss in two tertiary hospitals. Results: In all, 112 children with measles-induced hearing loss were studied. Majority (92.8%) were struck by the auditory shutdown at age 0.5–5 years. Most (87.5%) of the measles-induced hearing losses were sensorineural with 73.5% of them being profound, bilateral, and irreversible. Majority were not diagnosed early due to a lack of visible or palpable diagnostic features. Majority (70.5%) of the children were not vaccinated against measles. Features suggestive of encephalitis were commonly associated with the profound sensorineural hearing loss. About 10% concomitantly used ototoxic antibiotics at the acute stage of the measles infection. About 84% of the children were deaf and dumb. Conclusion: This study shows that measles-induced hearing loss often affects children around the age of speech acquisition leaving the victims deaf and dumb. Late diagnosis is characteristic of the auditory shutdown. The need to scale up effective antimeasles vaccination among children is hereby stressed. Routine postmeasles hearing assessment of victims is a practicable step to identify early those that require prompt rehabilitation with hearing aid or cochlear implant.


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